Core Physics has 20 years of experience writing and supporting an Fortran applications.

We are available to provide:

  • Simple porting of existing Fortran programs from one platform/compiler to another;
  • Modification of existing Fortran programs to fix errors, add new features, or modernize to take advantage of modern Fortran language features; or
  • Creation of new Fortran applications for numerical analysis using a set of customer specifications.

Core Physics has Fortran experience on many Unix platforms (Linux, Sun, HP, IBM, DEC) and on the Windows PC. Compiler experience includes the various Unix vendors, Intel, Lahey, G95 and GFortran. We also have experience porting programs from VMS to Unix or Windows.

We always strive to write 100% standard conforming code and to use source control to track any modification history. We also have extensive experience in working with procedures such as 10 CFR 50 Appendix B, ASME NQA-1, and ISO-9001.

Examples of our work include:

  • Supporting large nuclear engineering codes up to 250,000 lines in length. Support included modernization, bug fixes, and adding additional capabilities.
  • Writing new numerical analysis codes from a set of specifications.
  • Conversion of large nuclear engineering codes from Unix systems with many vendor extensions to Linux systems and open source compilers (G95 and GFortran). (Note that these compilers have many advantages, but do not produce the fastest optimizations).
  • Conversion of codes from VMS to Windows PC using the Compaq and Intel Fortran compilers. The VMS codes used extensive vendor extensions.
  • Modifying legacy codes to remove vendor extensions, convert memory management from "container arrays" to allocatable arrays, and convert common blocks to Fortran modules.

To Get started:

  • Contact us (owner@corephysics.com) to discuss what you have and what your needs are.
  • For existing codes, we will usually want to inspect the code to see what is involved.
  • We will then work closely with the customer to develop a scope of work, a set of specifications, a schedule, and a test plan.
  • No job is too big or too small.

Last update: Thu Dec 9 07:05:06 PST 2010
Questions? owner@corephysics.com